.ll 72
.fo off
.co on 
.ce ((Editor's comments in double parenthesis - Homer))
 
.ce ADR - 420
.ce
 
.ce Copyright (C) Homer Wilson Smith
.ce Redistribution rights granted for non commercial purposes
 
======================================================================== 44
Resent-Date:  Wed, 06 Sep 89 22:20:08 EDT
Resent-From:  homer 
Resent-To:    adore-l@ualtavm

Forwarded from MAILJC.

From: Darin McGrew 
Subject: The Mice in the Piano (a parable)

The story submitted by Andreas Krueger (The Hermit's Tree,
MailJC Digest 5:9) reminded me of the parable of the Mice in the
Piano.  Well, more than a year later, I've finally typed it in.

    Imagine a family of mice who lived all their lives in a large piano,
    just as we live our lives in our fragment of the universe.  And to
    them in their piano-world came the music of the instrument, filling
    all the dark places with sound and harmony.  At first the mice were
    very much impressed by it.  They drew comfort and wonder from the
    thought that there was Someone who made the music--though invisible to
    them--above, yet close to them.  And they loved to think of the Great
    Player whom they could not see.

    Then one day a daring mouse climbed up part of the piano and returned
    very thoughtful.  He had discovered how the music was made.  Wires
    were the secret; tightly stretched wires of graduated lengths which
    trembled and vibrated.  They must revise all their old beliefs:  none
    but the most conservative could any longer believe in the Unseen
    Player.

    Later another explorer carried the explanation further:  hammers were
    the secret; dozens of hammers dancing and leaping on the wires.  This
    was a more complicated theory, but it all went to show that they lived
    in a purely mechanical and mathematical world.  The Unseen Player came
    to be thought of as a myth.

    But the pianist continued to play the piano.

I don't know the author.  If any of you do, please let me know.

Darin McGrew			mcgrew@Eng.Sun.COM

     Cute story.  The 'player' is YOU.

 homer               adore-l@ualtavm      9/06/89 MailJC Digest 6:16